Edmonton Real Estate Blog

(NC) Whether it’s in your backyard or a nearby park, lawns provide more than just aesthetic benefits, they contribute to happier and healthier communities. Here’s how:

  1. Providing oxygen that we breathe
    Green space are a valuable part of creating clean air anywhere. For example 15 square metres of grass produces enough oxygen for a family of four every day. That can help make a difference to how we feel and breathe.
  2. Reducing the warming effect of hard surfaces 
    When the summer heat hits, grass helps keep you cool. Street or sidewalk temperatures may reach 38 degrees Celsius or higher, but grass remains at 24 degrees. Your feet and your home can thank your lawn for lower temperatures.

  3.  Acting as water filtration systems 
    A healthy lawn will slow runoff and allow time for the water to seep back into the groundwater system, rather than overworking municipal storm sewer systems and creating a flood. A 900 square metre lawn can absorb more than 22,000 litres of water.

    To...
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(NC) With Canada’s housing market hotter than ever, saving up a down payment can feel impossible. But wise spending and saving decisions can add up over time. Here, Vanessa Bowen, money expert and accountant, offers simple yet effective ways to save for the home you’ve had your eye on.

Ensure you have a good credit score
A better credit score means that you can qualify for lower interest rates and loans that you may require when investing in a future property. Working to improve your overall credit score, such as by avoiding late bill payments, will help make your savings go further as you look towards purchasing the house or condo of your dreams.

Contribute lump-sum payments to your savings
Large annual payments such as a work bonus or your tax return can be added as lump-sum contributions to your savings. Contributing larger sums helps you reach your end-goal more quickly, so remember to save these payments. It’s money you don’t count on in your day to day anyway,...

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(NC) Whether it’s in your backyard or a nearby park, lawns provide more than just aesthetic benefits, they contribute to happier and healthier communities. Here’s how:
1. Providing oxygen that we breathe.

15 square metres of grass produces enough oxygen for a family of four every day.

2. Reducing the warming effect of hard surfaces.

Urban areas sprawling with buildings and concrete tend to be significantly warmer than areas with lush greenspaces.

3. Acting as water filtration systems.

A healthy lawn will slow runoff and allow time for the water to seep back into the groundwater system, rather than overworking municipal storm sewer systems and creating a flood. A lawn the size of 900 square metres can absorb more than 22,000 litres of water.

To provide these benefits, lawns require care. Pesticides are one tool that help protect lawns by keeping weeds and other pests under control. Health Canada regulates every pesticide sold in the country to ensure they can be used safely. A...

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(NC) After a year of working from home for many of us, it’s only natural to be hitting a rut. No matter how great your at-home work setup is, you might need a refresh.

Here are few tips to make working from home so much better:


1. Declutter your workspace
A lot of work-related clutter can build up over time. Take a few minutes to collect any office items lying around the house, such as your video call headphones or your loose papers and sticky notes. Then recycle anything you don’t need and store the rest in a dedicated location. You’ll feel fresher and ready to take on what’s next.

2. Upgrade your workwear
Just because you aren’t going into the office doesn’t mean you don’t deserve to feel your best and look sharp. If you’re keen on business wear, try easing into a new pair of pants or a simple summer dress to find a more relaxed summertime vibe. If you’ve defaulted to pyjamas and sweats every day, consider finding the happy medium with...

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(NC) In recent years, water damage from flooding has become increasingly common across Canada. In fact, the Insurance Bureau of Canada says that water damage accounts for nearly half of all insurance claims, and the frequency and cost of these claims has risen dramatically in recent years.  

Some of this increase in property water damage is due to climate change, with strong storms becoming more frequent and lasting longer. Infrastructure in many areas is old or inadequate and unable to handle the volume of water associated with these new storms as well as flash floods or snowmelt.  

Sewer backups are also occurring more often, both with old systems and with newer ones that are designed to handle both rain and sewer water. Faulty plumbing is another factor that can contribute to water damage, especially in aging, poorly constructed or poorly designed buildings. 

Despite these concerns, a poll from the Insurance Bureau of Canada revealed that more than a quarter of...

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(NC) An estimated three million Canadians have one, and they have emerged as the single largest contributor to the growth of household debt in Canada.


Yet many consumers do not appear to fully understand how they work.


No, we’re not talking about credit cards or car loans. We’re talking about home equity lines of credit or HELOCs.


According to a 2019 survey by the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada, many people appear to lack awareness of the terms and conditions of this widely sold financial product, exposing them to the risk of over-borrowing, carrying debt for extended periods and uninformed decision-making.


HELOCs are a secured form of revolving credit. The lender uses your home as a guarantee that you'll pay back the money you borrow. And, as you pay your HELOC down, you can borrow it again, up to a maximum credit limit.


Most major financial institutions offer them with a mortgage as a combined product, which is sometimes called a readvanceable mortgage. Many use them for...

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(NC) The term “house poor” is likely one we’re familiar with as Canadians. Given the ever-changing housing market, it’s something you may even have identified with. But what does it really mean? And how can we avoid it?

“House poor” is a situation that describes a person who “over-extends” themselves and spends an unusually large proportion of his or her total income (roughly 30-40% or more) on home ownership, including mortgage payments, property taxes, maintenance and utilities. If you’re feeling like a disproportionate amount of your income goes towards your home-related expenses, then you might be in this group.

According to the 2019 RBC home ownership poll, half of Canadians claim they would avoid a situation where they become house poor as they say it’s mentally stressful and financially irresponsible.

However, one in four Canadians does identify this way and approximately one in ten is prepared to put themselves in this position....

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(NC) With the Bank of Canada recently raising its key interest rate once again, many of are concerned about the impact on our household debt and mortgages. Fortunately, there are many tips and tricks for saving and budgeting you can use for other areas in your life.

Try the three-category budget. It can be overwhelming trying to track all your expenses, but it is advisable to have a baseline to check your progress. Money experts recommend picking just three categories you want to focus and get a handle on, since most of us overspend in just one or two categories. The three-category system is an easy way to get started on trimming expenses.

Pay down high-interest debt. One in three of us sometimes buy things we can’t afford. If you’ve put a few too many purchases on your credit cards, a big portion of your monthly payment are going just towards paying down debt. To get out ahead, consider moving the debt to a low-interest option, like a line of credit. When paying off...

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